external references


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RFC 2964 - Use of HTTP State Management
The mechanisms described in "HTTP State Management Mechanism" (RFC- 2965), and its predecessor (RFC-2109), can be used for many different purposes. However, some current and potential uses of the protocol are controversial because they have significant user privacy and security implications. This memo identifies specific uses of Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) State Management protocol which are either (a) not recommended by the IETF, or (b) believed to be harmful, and discouraged. This memo also details additional privacy considerations which are not covered by the HTTP State Management protocol specification.

RFC 2965 - HTTP State Management Mechanism
This document specifies a way to create a stateful session with Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) requests and responses. It describes three new headers, Cookie, Cookie2, and Set-Cookie2, which carry state information between participating origin servers and user agents. The method described here differs from Netscape's Cookie proposal [Netscape], but it can interoperate with HTTP/1.0 user agents that use Netscape's method. (See the HISTORICAL section.)

RFC 2109 - HTTP State Management Mechanism
This document specifies a way to create a stateful session with HTTP requests and responses. It describes two new headers, Cookie and Set-Cookie, which carry state information between participating origin servers and user agents. The method described here differs from Netscape's Cookie proposal, but it can interoperate with HTTP/1.0 user agents that use Netscape's method. (See the HISTORICAL section.)

The Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications (2002/58/EC)
As part of the European Commission's 1999 Review of the communications framework, a draft proposal to update the existing Telecoms Data Protection Directive (97/66/EC) was adopted on 12 July 2000, formerly known as the Communications Data Protection Directive (CDPD) but now known as the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications (DPEC). The overriding aim of the new Directive is to take account of technological changes and to make the provisions as technology-neutral as possible.

The final Directive, the DPEC, was adopted on 12 July 2002 and required implementation in Member States by 31 October 2003.

Draft Directive on data protection and privacy
Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council concerning the processing of personal data and the protection of privacy in the electronic communications sector


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